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Besides 8, are there other whole numbers that can be x? Thx

30 Answers

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Hi u/CosmicMiami,

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x^(3) = x^(2) + x^(2)

x^(3) = 2x^(2)

x^(3) - 2x^(2) = 0

x^(2)(x - 2) = 0

Solutions of x = 2 and x = 0 (if you count 0 to be a whole number).
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x^3 = 2x^2

x=2

8 isn’t even a valid solution. You get 16^2 on the other side.
by
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x^3 =x^2 +x^2

x^3 =2x^2

x^3 -2x^2 =0

x^2 (x-2)=0

continue
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Damn yall, what's the point of this sub if we're just going to downvote everything OP comments?
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0

0 = 0 + 0
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Try 2. Also maybe try 8 again. Just to be sure.
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Well 8 isnt the answer anyways.

Its 0 & 2
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irony is that the solutions are 0 and 2, 8 is not a solution and 0 is a whole number
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x^3 = 2x^2

x^3 / 2x^2 = 1

ln(x)-ln(2)=0

ln(x)=ln(2)

x=2

That's just the long way for finding something obvious

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