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How to study for Linear Algebra Exam?

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Exercises, exercises and exercises. Go through the  exercises available to you chapter by chapter. If you do not know the vocabulary used in the task, look it up. If you do, don’t. If you struggle with a task, skim over chapter and try to find something that might help you. If you have no clue how to solve the problem after some appropriate time spend thinking, look at the answer and identify the gap in your knowledge. Re-reading book chapters or lecture notes is for sure helpful during the semester, but this close to the exam, re-reading entire chapters is too inefficient — you spend time on recapping stuff you already know and might also feel a false sense of security because gaps in your knowledge aren’t as apparent when reading as opposed to doing exercises.

EDIT: Prioritise old exam questions from the same course (and the some professor), homework questions and questions from the text book if you have been working closely with it.
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The fast way is to *read definitions and theorems*, THEN just do exercises. You can't learn the facts via osmosis. And doing problems before you know the rules is not doing math. There aren't many big ideas in linear algebra (basically just the null/row/col space picture and eigenvalues). For the rest, treat the statement of the theorem as the underlying principle. If you need good intuition videos, 3b1b is king.

I am also a slow reader, but reading is how you learn math and it's all I've needed. The good news is, if you follow the above advice, there is very little to read. I've rarely found the interstitial exposition helpful. Your notes should basically just be a reference of theorems and tricks you've learned. Do not intermix those with examples you've worked.

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