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Focusing on Discrete Math or Multivariable Calculus before entering University?

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I vote for Linear Algebra (and Multivariable Calculus).

This builds upon more (revision) and more stuff builds upon this (useful) than for Discrete Maths.
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Assuming you have a strong high school background in math and good ability, and given that CS is a strong possibility, I'd suggest going through "Mathematical Thinking: Problem-Solving and Proofs" by D'Angelo and West. It's an overall introduction basically to what's in the title, and it covers various areas including some discrete topics.

If that book proves too difficult, try reading "Journey into Mathematics" by Rotman instead. It's shorter and easier.

If you choose multivariable calculus in the end, I'd suggest "Advanced Calculus of Several Variables" by C.H. Edwards, and if you find you don't have the background for that, then "Multivariable Mathematics" by Shifrin.
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Linear algebra is already not multivariable calculus, so not sure what options you are proposing
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Personally if I were in your situation i would learn how to write/read proofs. I learned the hard way that without being comfortable with it, studying advanced math becomes much much harder. If not that then I would start with Linear Algebra.
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Linear algebra first no matter what imo. Super useful for CS and understanding a lot of MV calc. After that, it’s up to what you’re interested in but multivariable calculus is very useful for engineering, so I’d recommend that. In terms of prepping for CS, I think it’d be a lot better just to learn whatever language your uni teaches than doing discrete math anyways.
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Damn, in my country, pre calculus is the highest math that we study in highschool. Public school btw. Lol
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I'd start with proofs and discrete math. Don't know where you're from but in my country there's an emphasis on proving things for every single exam, plus it's a great skill to facilitate as a STEM student. And discrete math is just more approachable, it's arguably less abstract and usually gives good motivation for its topics.

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