0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
How do I solve for y, so that i can graph it?

5 Answers

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
You had:  
y - x/9 = 2  
  
Is it solved for y? No.  
  
We have to do something about that x/9.  
  
What is x/9 doing?  
It is subtracting (from y).  
  
What is the opposite of subtracting?  
Adding.  
  
So we add x/9 to both sides:  
  
y = 2 + x/9  
  
Is it solved for y? Yes.  
  
Does it look like y = mx + b?  
  
Not exactly.  
  
Then let's arrange it a little:  
  
y = x/9 + 2  
  
y = (1/9)x + 2  
  
Ta da!
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
9y-x=18

Before you divide, isolate the y variable. Add x to both sides

9y=x+18

Divide both sides by 9. That means all terms, 9y/9, x/9 or 1/9*x, and 18/9.

Simplify:
y=1/9x+2

You now have everything to graph the line in slope intercept form: y=mx+b. The y intercept is 2, and the slope is 1/9.

Whether you divide all terms by 9 first and get:

y-x/9=2

Or whether you add x to both sides and get:

9y=18+x

You need to identify the terms and ask yourself what they want solved. They want the equation solved for y which means the y variable by itself equals everything else.

If you have y-x/9=2, what is stopping y from being by itself? -x/9. To get rid of it, add the inverse to both sides and get y=1/9x+2.

If you have 9y=18+x, what is stopping y from being by itself? 9y. To get rid of it, multiply the inverse to both sides and get the same thing.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
change the line into the intercept form : x/a + y/b = 1

where 'a' is x intercept and 'b' is y intercept now plot the points (a,0) and (0,b) on the graph and draw a line passing through the plotted graph.

Boom you got the graph
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
If I'm reading the comments correctly, I was doing okay the second time around by ADDING X to both sides, and messed up by not converting x/9 into 1/9x?
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
You don’t need to eliminate x or y. The equation is for a linear graph, so once you’re able to find 2 different points on the graph, you’re good to go.

The simplest solution:

1. Isolate the y:

9y - x = 18

9y = x + 18

y = (x + 18)/9

y = (1/9)x + 2 -> this is the equation for a line in the form of y = mx + c; the x and y values are variable, the m value is the gradient (the rate by which y increases in relation to x), and the c is the y-intercept - or the number you have with 0x.

2. Obtain 2 points on the graph

All that’s left to do is plug 2 random real numbers for x values (i like to use 0, then a random integer). Then plot the resulting two points (x value you chose, resulting y value) then connect the dots.

For your case, notice that the gradient/slope is 1/9? That means that with each +1 increase in x, y increases by 1/9. For example, if you increase the x value by 4 at any given point, the resulting y value increases by 4*(1/9)=4/9

So if you want to avoid fractions (like most normal people would), you should plug multiples of 9 in x, because increasing by 1/9 9 times overall is an increase of 9/9 = 1.

This would make graphing easier.

Related questions

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
0 answers
MorganHoover_ asked Jun 21
"Previous comparison of change in CAPS score between sertraline and placebo showed effect sizes of 0.31 and 0.37 (ref. 16). Similarly, comparison of change in CAPS score ...
MorganHoover_ asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
7 answers
kajhendriks asked Jun 21
I'm talking about notation that I see in my stats book that looks like the notation here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Probability_density_function#Absolutely_continuous...
kajhendriks asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
0 answers
therealjd2424 asked Jun 21
I’m an undergrad doing a meta-analysis on the economic benefits of Fairtrade for smallholder farmers. The studies in my meta-analysis only report the means and sample s...
therealjd2424 asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
19 answers
chorleyfc asked Jun 21
What do you do after an exam without instant results?
chorleyfc asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
9 answers
SpiderMan asked Jun 21
Do you think exam/title raises will soon be adjusted for inflation?
SpiderMan asked Jun 21

24.8k questions

103k answers

0 comments

33.7k users

OhhAskMe is a math solving hub where high school and university students ask and answer loads of math questions, discuss the latest in math, and share their knowledge. It’s 100% free!