0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
How many times do we need to fold a paper to get a stack with the following heights?

2 Answers

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
A standard piece of printer paper is about 0.1 millimeters thick. Every time you fold it, it doubles in thickness. There are 304.8 millimeters in a foot, and 5,280 feet in a mile.

That’s everything you need to find your answers.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Consider the following.

We can calculate the height depending on initial height (ie thickness, denoted h\_0) and number of folds.

So, h(n) = h\_0 \* 2\^n

So, if you want to solve this for the number of folds, you get

log\_2 (h(n) / h\_0) = n

Now only plug in h(n) for the height you wanna calculate and h\_0 for the thickness of your "material".

Related questions

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
2 answers
thebandapp asked Jun 21
If you subscribe to a service that is £100 a year for a 5 year term, and you also get £50 sign up discount and one year free, which of the following do you pay?
thebandapp asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
2 answers
AlecGarnett asked Jun 21
how to solve this? As the rows are dependent I only get 2x+y-3z=0. What am I supposed to do from here? I have no other idea then guessing solutions. I know the solution i...
AlecGarnett asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
3 answers
JoSVolpe asked Jun 21
How do you get to the simplified answer shown? Thanks in advance
JoSVolpe asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
2 answers
mhumane asked Jun 21
Can anyone tell me do I use minus or plus here? I know what to do to get the equation if it's "fine angle" or "Obtuse angle" But don't know what to do when it's an Isosce...
mhumane asked Jun 21
by mhumane
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
2 answers
OmmarElArdWorld asked Jun 21
Why can e, the number you get by doing 100% compound interest over infinite time periods, also be calculated by summing (1/x!) to infinity? What's the correlation/what do...
OmmarElArdWorld asked Jun 21

24.8k questions

103k answers

0 comments

33.7k users

OhhAskMe is a math solving hub where high school and university students ask and answer loads of math questions, discuss the latest in math, and share their knowledge. It’s 100% free!