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Is Delta math wrong or am I wrong?

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AND between the two inequalities means that both have to be satisfied. If you draw them both, only one applies at the end.
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it can be shortened to x > -7 because every value for x that satisfies that must also satisfy x ≥ -9. in other words, any x that is greater than (-7) is already either greater than or equal to (-9).

worth noting: every number greater than (-7) is strictly greater than (-9), but "greater than OR equal to" only requires the number to be one of "greater than" / "equal to". so, it's ok that we're not worrying about (-9) itself since it isn't greater than (-7) anyway.
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AND means overlap so x>-7 is the answer.

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