0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Do mathematical physics textbooks contain proofs of theorems?

1 Answer

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Mathematical physics is still math. They follows the usual math convention: there are axioms and theorems. Mathematical physics isn't really physics, it's more like math that was inspired or somewhat related to physics. There are a lot of things in them that are not physically relevant, like toy model that is not a real theory of anything, but has some mathematically similar properties to what a real theory would look like. Or sometimes they used techniques inspired by physics to tackle a question interested by mathematician.

Related questions

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
8 answers
yousefalshrouf asked Jun 21
For those not in consulting and without direct reports, how many hours of meetings do you average per week?
yousefalshrouf asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
22 answers
TechChange asked Jun 21
35 Years Ago, my department functioned with 3 actuaries. Today, with vastly improved computing power, we have about 75. Why do we need so many more? Is a lot of it admini...
TechChange asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
0 answers
coachski_ asked Jun 21
How did Euler do all the wonderful things he did without a today's technology? Or did he just do all of the wonderful things because he was so ahead of his time?
coachski_ asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
4 answers
TommyBanks8 asked Jun 21
Recently i started Problems in Mathematical Analysis 1: Real Numbers, Sequences and Series by Kaczor Nowak. Its problems are very tough. So i need some books which have a...
TommyBanks8 asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
4 answers
MissEssDeeBee asked Jun 21
How do I determine the order of vectors in the cross product? Youtuber uses <1,2,1> X <2,-1,3> but how would I know it do it like that? I could've easily done <2,-1,3> X ...
MissEssDeeBee asked Jun 21

24.8k questions

103k answers

0 comments

33.7k users

OhhAskMe is a math solving hub where high school and university students ask and answer loads of math questions, discuss the latest in math, and share their knowledge. It’s 100% free!