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How much mathematics do I need for science? Chemistry,biology,physics?

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Definitely brush up on your algebra. From my experience, general courses of biology are not heavily math based. Chemistry math can range from using some pretty basic algebra to some intermediate calculus although you can more than likely get by without using calculus.

Physics without a doubt will be the heaviest in terms of math usage. A good understanding of algebra goes a very long way since a lot of concepts in calculus heavily rely on how well you know your algebra. Take the time to brush up on some trigonometry as well
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early chemistry relies a lot on algebra to describe how different properties interact with each other. in my experience, I have a BS in chemistry and there wasn't a huge amount of calculus needed. the exception was for physical chemistry which involves how particles and energies move and interact in different systems. even that didn't require much more than some multivariable calculus (which is less scary than it sounds).

for now, get yourself comfortable with algebra, especially isolating variables and manipulating equations. brushing up on units and word problems is also a good idea for all three fields. (for example: I drove 100 km in my 25 mpg car. if gas costs $4.25/gal, how much money did I spend on the gas I used?)
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If by "basics" you mean high school level (say at the level of an AP exam), then you don't need much for Biology/Chemistry. If you've taken Algebra I/II that should be more than enough. For Physics, you absolutely need calculus to understand the basics. Calc I (derivatives) is necessary to understand Mechanics, and for introductory electricity and magnetism you'd need Calc II (integrals).

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Edit: It's worth noting that there are "algebra-based" physics classes, but in my experience they try (and usually fail) to just teach "pseudo-calculus" while teaching actual physics, and students come out understanding neither physics nor calculus. I'd really just recommend learning calculus first and going from there.

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