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Guys if my answer is 1.16666667 should I write it as 1.167 or let it rest?

19 Answers

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In doubt, go for 7/6.
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If the problem is a pure equation, don't express answer as a rounded decimal unless you are instructed to do so!
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If you’re studying to be an engineer, just round it to 1
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I was always taught to use a bar over the infinitely repeated character eg. 1.16̅
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Rounding conventions are mostly based on context, and for students that context usually just means however your teacher tells you to do it.

In science classes, you usually have to deal with significant figures, but that rarely comes up in math classes
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As another person said, it might be 7/6. Was it a word problem or an equation with no context?
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don't include more decimal than precision of the original numbers if you are an engineer
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I mean it depends on how many digits you want to round to, but 1.16666667 does round to 1.167 if you want 3 digits after the decimal point! Also you're correct in saying 1.6666666667 rounds to 1.67 if we want 2 decimal places.

Basically, depending on how precise we want to be, we could round 1.16666667 to lots of things, e.g. 1.166667, 1.16667, 1.167, or even 1.17 or 1.2 if we only want a really rough estimate.

How many decimal places you want to give will depend on the context - if I want to tell someone what 7÷6 is roughly, I might say "it's about 1.167" or even "it's about 1.2", but if someone wants 7÷6 to *5 decimal places*, say, I would give the answer "7÷6=1.16667 (5 d.p.)". That "(5 d.p.)" bit lets the reader know you've rounded it to 5 decimal places - it's not the exact answer.

If you want to write the decimal out, but don't want to round, you can write 7÷6=1.16, but then put a dot or a line above that 6 to indicate it repeats forever. Or just write 7÷6=1.1666... - that's just as clear! (but maybe not what you're asked for)
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7/6, unless you have to use a decimal
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Most of the questions I got in school focused on the largest number of digits after the decimal place, for example if you had

5.99/3.257=x

Then x would be 1.83911575…etc

You would just round it to 1.839, because 3.257 only had 3 places after the decimal

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