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Career and Education Questions: June 16, 2022

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I'm considering doing my masters in Ireland, or Great Britain. I'm starting the final year of my bachelor this autumn, and figured it's time to think ahead. I'm thinking statistical inference/AI learning or something along those lines, but I'm not 100% yet.

Any and all input would be recommended. Any particular schools to consider?
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Hi am an undergrad math student who transferred from a two year community college to a four year uni and it would take me at least two years to get my BS in math. For a little background. I was initially interested in physics with the goal of persuing astronomy or theoretical physics, but after taking the introductory physics course I struggled and got bored which discouraged me from taking any further physics courses and I switched to math. I absolutely love math despite all the pain that it caused me I can’t see myself not doing math. That being said, I’m having doubts concerning career paths. when people refer to math careers they always mention finance and buisness which I have no interest in whatsoever. Which put me through a crisis. Most of my career interests lie in physics and physical sciences and there is also the theoretical approach which is what I became mostly interested in After the physics incident.

  
option 1: I thought about a double major or minor in philosophy since I’m also really interested in it and love it almost as much as math but I’m not sure how it can add to my math major and perhaps it won’t be and efficient use of my time and money at a uni. And I think I can take one or two philosophy course as an elective. But if i choose to do so, I will probably have the most fun. Or I can always study philosophy in my free time.

  
Option 2: my university offers a major in mathematical physics but switching to that means i would need 3 years at least to get the degree and i don’t have the financial capabilities for that or the time and it also means I would miss out on the higher maths. Or I could minor in physics and take as many courses to do a masters in mathematical physics related field or a physical science. The only downfall of this plan is that I don’t know how I will do in physics considering my history with it. Going through mechanics would perhaps be the biggest step in that path despite the more difficult topics ahead. But perhaps since now I know more math (up to differential equations and linear algebra) that I would do fine in calc based mechanics.   


i would really appreciate  some guidance and advice.
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**tl;dr** How bad is it to transfer grad programs after one semester?

Longer version: I'm attending a backup school this fall for applied mathematics (like, bottom of the list safety school) as a Master's student. I.e., lower stipend than PhD to the point that it's barely livable. I would like to branch out to other areas (operations research, financial engineering/math, etc.) and I would like to do so as soon as possible. I understand that it's bad etiquette to abandon a research professor after one semester, but I'm twenty two and I don't want to waste my early twenties at somewhere that I'm not happy.

Any advice is appreciated, thanks in advance.
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Does anyone have any 'side hustles' using their math/physics background? Looking for something to make spending/travel money before I begin PhD studies.
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Howdy, I'm an undergraduate Math student, I graduate Spring 2023. Because of COVID, I was entirely unable to get any research, internships, or professional experience over the past two years, and I have no network of professors or even peers. I'd like to get a Masters in Math, or possibly some natural science like Oceanography, and then work in the natural sciences in some way.

But I am reasonably worried about what to do about applications to grad schools. I have a competitive GPA, \~3.8, and have taken courses covering most major fields of math. I'm confident in my skills in problem solving, and have experience with multiple programming languages (C,C++,Python). But without research or anything of the such to show for it, I'm just not sure it's competitive enough to get me into a "good" program (I've been looking at mostly state schools such as Texas A&M, University of Washington, but will likely also apply to reach programs like MIT, Stanford, etc.).

Lastly, is a Masters in Math even the right choice? I love doing math, I've enjoyed most of my undergraduate courses (Abstract Algebra threw me for a loop, but I survived). But would it make more sense to go straight for a PhD, or a Masters in some other science?  


tl;dr: COVID left me high and dry, and now I need to make decisions with very little social currency.
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Hi all, I was wondering if anyone had opinions on a second bachelor's degree in mathematics. I'm from Canada with a completely unrelated first bachelor's (human biology/kinesiology). I gained an intense interest in math after recently finishing my undergrad, and want to eventually apply mathematics to the health-care field (not sure what yet, but things like machine learning or mathematical biology/ bioinformatics types jobs are something im open to). Is a second degree a waste of time/unneeded or is it warranted given my unrelated first bachelor's?
  

  
The second degree would be at a relatively well known university in Canada (with co-op) if that matters.
  

  
thanks
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How employable am I as a mathematician with only an associate degree, MOOC courses to fill in the rest of a bachelor's degree in mathematics and a few minor published papers?  
What are possible sources of employment, if any?
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Any actuaries here? I'm a senior year high school student, not from the US, applying to college this year (hoping to get into Lehigh University).
They offer a minor in actuarial science, and cover 2 actuarial exams. I've always found applied sciences more... Interesting. They seem harder, but I haven't gotten much experience with them (I was in a regional for the IYPT contest once, and failed badly- and I've always wanted to reach that kind of understanding of math and mathematical modeling)

Any advice for BS? Would you consider Lehigh a good place for study? (Although I've heard university prestige doesn't matter for the Actuarial Profession)

I have experience with CS if that matters, It's actually my best subject right now (I'm a Cambridge A levels student, but I'm broke so I can't apply for the UK, I'm just hoping I can get aid in the US. My country doesn't have professions in math, teachers and professors are terribly underpaid so I might give in and go for engineering if I stay here). But math is just far more interesting to me.
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Hi, I'm a college dropout who majored in communications, and somehow I recently found out what I want to pursue in my life, which is Biology. As you guys already know Biology needs some math, and I am absolutely so terrible at math. For background, I can plus, minus, and multiply. Oh and, I know what FOIL is. This is everything I know about math - It's not an exaggeration. I know it's terrible, but I really want to study biology and work in this field in the future. So, my question is where should I begin with? Before I go to college again, I want to be prepared as much as I can so that I could get an A in Calculus 1/2/3 class easily. I have plenty of time, and I can literally use at least 10 hours a day for studying. Should I begin with Elementary school level math, or Algebra 1? Also, I can't afford a private tutor, they're expensive. If you know any study tips or good resources, please let me know. I really want to do this, but there is no one who can give me advice about college, math, or how to study.
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Hey everyone, going to enter Uni soon and wanted to finalize my major. I've given myself the option between Finance and Accounting, Economics, and Maths with DataScience/Management. I've already asked similar questions regarding this elsewhere (check my profile) but wanted to ask more questions pertaining math itself here. So here goes:

Is Maths a difficult major? How many hours a week should I dedicate outside of lectures? Is this a good major over my given options, why and why not? What are my career options with a bachelor's alone?

For now this is it. Thanks!

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