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Best way for you to learn?

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So far I've found the best way for me to learn is to simply read the course text! Take notes through the sections and work exercises
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As a math teacher, I've seen varying levels of success using the reverse/flipped classroom style of teaching/learning. Unfortunately, some teachers blindly assume that all the students will be (a) motivated to do all the required reading and studying overnight, and (b) able to grasp at least a basic understanding of the information, before class the next day. Sometimes, those don't work out as planned. While the assigned material is hopefully a decent enough primer for the following day, the following day (when the students come back to class) needs to be really well-structured by the teacher, to reinforce/boost the students' understanding of last night's packets. Usually, this comes in the form of a collaborative discussion, problem set, or something else a little more substantial than a simple Q&A where the professor answers some questions (as some students might not even know, or be able to formulate, the kinds of clarifications they need). It depends on the teacher, the students, and sometimes even the topic being learned. Some students prefer this method, while others prefer a more direct approach from a lecturer, while still others prefer exploring a new concept with a partner or small group. There's a lot of interesting - and often conflicting or ambiguous - research out there about which teaching methods are "best", but a lot of it is really subjective.
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I don't really like reverse classroom as a student. While the one lecture I would prepare I would learn very well, all others are prepared by different people and thus each lecture would have a different format, a different style. And this inconsistency throws me off.

I rather have a mediocre professor giving mediocre classes that I can get used to and know what to expect, how to prepare for it, how to process it, than constantly changing lecture style and quality.
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I had a class like this in my undergrad (using the Moore method) and it was by far the most challenging and rewarding class in my undergraduate experience. I wish I had more like it. That said, I don’t think the flipped classroom is appropriate for all classes. As other commenters have pointed out it works best when you have an interested and motivated audience, and so I think it’s a better fit for upper division courses within the major. For lower division courses or courses with broader audiences, I feel a more traditional lecture is the way to go (and this is the approach I most often use in my own courses).
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What do you mean "reverse classroom style of teaching"

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