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Book recommendations for Measure Theory?

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Measure theory is an advanced undergraduate course or early graduate course. A good treatment requires knowledge of analysis. What is your background?
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If the other recommendations seem to advanced I'd recommend starting with an introduction to analysis textbook. One of my favorites is Understanding Analysis by Stephen Abbot. It is written very well and self contained.
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None. I would not recommend anyone with a non-math background to study Measure Theory.
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In my opinion, the most straightforward is Elements of Integration and Lebesgue Measure by Bartle. Given your background, I’d recommend that at the bare minimum, you take a course in multivariable calculus and linear algebra.    These are the basic courses for a student going into a math major. You’d probably also want to take an additional proof based math course; an introduction to analysis would be the most helpful.
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As other have mentioned, measure theory will be quite difficult to get into without some more background. First you'll need to acquaint yourself with some analysis. Abbott's book *Understanding Analysis* is a great book for first learning analysis. Maybe you can start there
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Do what thou wilt, but based on the background you mentioned, I'll join in with the others discouraging you from it. Ultimately, it'll most likely be a waste of your time because you will definitely struggle with the material and even if you don't, you will not be in a position to appreciate the results, not having studied analysis and integration properly. Measure theory is a very technical subject and is chock-full of fussy, meticulous proofs, so unless you're willing to take it all on faith you'll have a tough time, and then if you do skip all the proofs that would be like not learning the subject at all, so you see the dilemma.

But, if you're resolute in this, Halmos' "Measure Theory" is pretty elementary IIRC, Axler's "Measure, Integration and Real Analysis" is also pretty good and starts off with a review of the Riemann integral.
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Do analysis first, I suggest up to the formal definition of riemann integrals. Measure theory will seem a) very very hard and b) very very dry without this background.
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Bauer has a great measure theory book
“Measure and integration theory by Heinz Bauer”
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Rudin's real and complex analysis was for me the easiest way to learn it. However before doing so I suggest reading chapters 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7 of his prior book which has the benefit of being self contained
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"A concise introduction to measure theory" by Satish shirali is what I would recommend. It is fairly accessible if you know the standard analysis topics. I prefer it over Axler (I've tried both of them) as I found Axler a bit more dense but that maybe because I didn't have much knowledge at that time.

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