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Non-native English speakers: What does your blackboard look like?

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I'm a native English speaker but I own a calculus textbook in Japanese and they just use the exact same notation as in the US
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I'm German and instead of 1.5 we write 1,5 which isn't a huge difference in math but I'm just learning coding in university and it has happened a couple of times so far that I'd spend a veeery long time searching for the mistake in my code when finally figuring out the input is just wrong because I was using a comma instead of the dot...
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For mathematics, a lot of it is using the same symbols and things, like f'. I took a math test in Chinese (I only speak English and a little German) and, while I could not read a lot of the "fluff", I was able to understand the questions.
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It us the same notation world over. I might use æ, ø or å as variable just for fun, but it is mostæy the same. Funnily enough, we write hviss instead of iff, but i get the feeling that it is almost an inside joke among people.
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I'm a native English speaker but living in Japan, here, the symbol for "approximately equal to" isnt  ≈ , instead ≒ is used.
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German textbooks luckily use pretty much exactly the same notations and abbreviations as US-textbooks. In fact, every graduate-level course in germany (from my experience) is provided in english anyway, thus there is no confusion whatsoever.
by
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As a German, I have actually used an umlaut as a variable before, but it was more of a joke.
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Native spanish speaker from Spain here. It's mostly the same as english, I could only think of two peculiarities:

1. Function *sin(x)* is sometimes called *sen(x)*, as "sine" in spanish is "seno". It dependes on the person, but people here understand both. For same reason sometimes, if *f* is a polynomial, *deg(f)* is written as *gr(f)* as degree's translation is *gr* (this one is much less common tho).
2. In spanish we have written accents and we sometimes, again depending on the person, put them when writing operators or other kind of "text" symbols. For example *mod* from modular arithmetic is written as *mód.* There were other examples that now I cannot remember, but for example in LaTeX if you use the babel spanish package they will come accented unless you specify otherwise.
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Bengali speaker here. We use the standard Western notation for mathematics.
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Basic geometry is a field where western notation isn’t fixed.

In France, the arrows for parallel lines doesn’t exist, (AB) means a straight line, [AB] a line segment.

ABC is the notation for a triangle and there is no specific notation for similar triangles.

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