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Hey Everyone, I'm a recently graduate biology PhD (ecology and evolution) and I have been considering leaving academia. I worked really hard to be proficient in statistics, and have multiple publications where I was involved in analyzing the data and presenting the results for peer-review. I've been looking at statistician positions on USAjobs but have no idea if I qualify for them. I am also interested in private sector jobs as well. Does anyone have any experience making this same transition? Or have insights into what I should do to make myself more competitive? I run all my statistics in R, and can perform all the analyses that are listed in the job description. I don't have the number of statistics courses that they are looking for, but I do potentially have years of stats experience (PhD, publishing, etc.), does that count for something?

Any advice that you all have would be fantastic. Thank you for your responses in advance.
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I'm in the process myself right now, and got a few useful advice from friends and colleagues who did it before, although I'm looking mostly at data scientist positions, not just statistician. Most of the following advice is probably irrelevant for pharma industry statistician jobs, but I don't see a lot of these jobs anyway.

Learning Python opens a lot of opportunities, and it's really not hard coming from R. There's a good course on Udemy, wait for it to be discounted (if it's not, open a private navigation window and it will probably be).

You could learn SQL too if you have one-two weeks available, never a bad idea.

Specifically for data science, try to do a few challenges on kaggle. For statistician position, I think it's mostly irrelevant.

Someone had advised DataCamp a few years ago, but I found it pretty bad (it basically only teaches the basic syntax of different packages). The certification may help make sure HR doesn't throw your CV before passing it to someone competent though.

Finally, look for jobs where the recruiter came from academia. They're much more likely to look at your cv and understand and appreciate actual statistics skills (my experience so far, and what others told me too). Networking is also important, you or people around you certainly know some people in industry.

Good luck!
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Life and job experience counts a ton! I wish I had more insight into the specific "profession" you're looking to transition into because it's a professional skill set that seems Extremely well hidden from the general public in all of it's Employment Environments it's a part of the Lifeblood of. Best of Luck! It's a fascinating tool to specialize in the use and history of!
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> does that count for something?

Something, sure, but given the overall standard of stats work in research in those academic areas (some of it's good, but a lot of stuff I see in biology and ecology is pretty bad), just stating that fact might count for a lot less than you'd expect.

On the other hand *showing* the (presumably high) standard of your work would likely count for more (whether in papers or on some relevant projects). Once you get to an interview, your knowledge will be easier to convey.
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Try AgTech. They will have statistician jobs and DS jobs that are basically statistician jobs

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