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Hi - I've decided to make the switch from a Big4 actuarial consulting role (in M&A, if this makes a difference) to traditional insurance (leaning towards either life or health, but still open-minded to other areas since I have no experience). Right now, I have 5 exams (going to take my 6th one at the firm I'm currently at), on the ASA track, and have 1.5 years of work experience with limited technical experience (consulting here basically just uses Excel and Alteryx - from time to time).

I'm trying to do my research and learn more about the traditional areas of actuarial roles in insurance with the goal of being able to show my knowledge, curiosity, and interest during interviews down the road. I also want to be informed of the current trends (in life/health insurance mostly) and tools that actuaries are utilizing.

Does anyone have advice on where to start and what sources to read up on?

Thanks in advance! :)
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get ready to be bored for a while. you are gonna think that carrier is running in slow motion vs big4.
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I’d to hear more, similar background as you but I’m interested if transitioning from consulting to carrier with around 2 yrs of experience and ASA is difficult.

It’s hard to get deep product or pricing knowledge beyond brochures with client facing work in a niche area like building data pipelines.
Would it be hard to get a pricing role in carrier without a pay cut or lower position?
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I did the same switch and it’s been fantastic. However I will say that I did it when I was 7.5 years into my career and had been an FSA for almost 5 years. I was able to leverage that into a high ‘entry point’ at the insurance company. Promotions/raises move much much slower at insurance companies so the higher floor that came with moving later was really valuable.

Think of it like you’re stepping off a roller coaster and onto an escalator. The longer you stay on the roller coaster the further up you are on the escalator once you hop off. The work life balance is WAY better but in return your career trajectory is slower.
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I'm in the same boat but see a lot of posting that requires coding experience.. how does interviewees answer for that if they've only been working in excel/projection softwares
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I would not sweat too much. Just get into a rotational program… try networking on linkedin and schedule some calls.

At your level your experience does not matter too much.


Eventually someone may offer you a referral and before ya know if youll have a job offer lined up :)
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