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I have been at my job for 2.5 years. I enjoy it minus going into the office so I have been looking for something remote. Yesterday I got an offer from another company. A very similar role just fully remote and 10k more than I currently make. I told my boss this morning that I got an offer and was thinking about taking it so I may be putting in my two weeks in the next few days. He said I’d be missed, told me who to CC in my resignation email, and wished me luck. I was hoping for more of a fight but being that there wasn’t one after a few hours I emailed the other company saying I’d accept. Then at the end of the work day my boss’s boss came by my desk and said they really want me to stay, asked why I was leaving, and said I could work remote and that they will try to match the raise if I’m interested. I’m VERY interested but is it too late!? I’m so mad at myself for sending that email! Wish my boss would have given me a warning sign. I haven’t signed anything official. How bad would it be to rescind the offer? And if I do stay is my company going to try to replace me now that they know I’ve been shopping around? I’m so stressed. Any thoughts or advice would be greatly appreciated.
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These things happen and and ppl understand. You can respond to that email and say I am glad to announce I am not leaving.
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Yeah it happens all the time. Wouldn't worry about the relationship with the company you stay at.

The bridge will likely be burned with the new company though.
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Nothing new to say: It happens often. No one will be too shocked, but you will burn bridges with the new company and hiring manager.
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If you want a higher risk/reward option, you could always throw out a "I was really interested in working remote, but they changed my status and matched your offer of x after I put in my resignation. For 10-15% more, I would still leave though." Definitely less likely to have a good outcome now that you've already accepted.

Would you like anything else better about the new company?

Will you be one of the only remote employees at current company? I doubt they'd immediately replace you. You'd probably be more on the low end of raises/promotion and more likely to be let go in a layoff/reorg unless you were really overdue for that 10k raise and are getting a deserved promotion to a higher level (which is definitely possible)
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Important question... had you asked your current employer about remote working before?

If yes, and they said "no remote work", then the culture probably wouldn't be a good fit.  You'd be the 'exception to the rule' and probably miss out on a bunch.

If no, then lesson learned you need to better communicate your career growth desires to your management team... but then I'd say it comes down to your upward mobility, where you're more excited to be, etc.
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You should leave anyways. Never take a counter offer as I have learned from experience.
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Totally fine and happens more often than you think. If a company can rescind an offer extended, so can you.
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don't burn bridges, benefit you in the long run
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Higher pay is happening. I encourage all of you to ask for it and find it.

The market is catching up to the fact that it takes less ability to make more money in a few other fields.
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There's nothing wrong with "un-accepting" a job offer, especially if it's done shortly after accepting.  People accept counter offers all the time, no one will take it personally as long as you're fully transparent with both parties about your decision.
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