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I passed pre-calc with a C, after HOURS of tutoring, but after meeting with the same tutor this semester he mentioned that my algebra were quite weak. This doesn't come as a surprise to me as math has been a struggle since high school, but I always "got through it" and I can't do that anymore. Is there anything I can do while I'm enrolled in Calc I to still pass? Or should I drop, and relearn from a certain point? I haven't taken an algebra course in 5 years, so I'm 110% lost. Thanks in advance for any insight <3

edit: I"m a cs major, if that helps in determining what type of calculus.
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There are various resources to review algebra.

It's up to you if you can do that while in the calculus class, or if you think you will still be motivated to do it without being in that class.
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Algebra is a STRICT prerequisite to Calculus, especially topics such as factoring, simplification, inequalities, and being able to manipulate equations.

Unfortunately It really isn’t possible to understand calculus without a solid basis of algebra. When I tutored Calc I and noticed a student becoming confused when I factored or something, I surprised them our next appointment with zero Calc work. No homework, no explaining reasoning. No, we would be doing basic algebra the entire time.

Everything I could think of basically until they understood what was going on and could teach ME how to solve certain equations that I hand selected bc of difficulty. At that point, the calculus came soooo much easier because calculus is actually super intuitive. It really does make sense, but you have to be able to “read the language” of it first.

So you should have a tutor help you exclusively with algebra or self-teach algebra during the course if you can handle it. It WILL pay off especially if you have math down the road to do.
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this is by far the most common reason that people do badly in calculus classes. it's nothing to do with calculus, it's that they never actually understood the fundamentals of algebra.

here's the test that I give to check whether your algebra is good enough for calculus or not:

let f(x) = (x+1)/(x^(2)-x+1). write down the expression (f(x)+f(-x))/2 and add the fractions together and simplify it. can you do it:

1. without needing to be reminded how to add fractions,
2. without needing to be reminded how to multiply polynomials,
3. without someone to tell you exactly which steps to take, and
4. without doing something completely nonsensical?

if you can do this then you should have no problem with calculus. if you make a small mistake like a sign error, or maybe you're just a bit slow at doing it, that's fine too and you should still be ok. if you can't do it then you'll probably struggle with calculus.

it is not possible to succeed in math without actually understanding the concepts. if you do not understand the fundamental concepts of algebra, the only way to fix this problem is to go back to the first thing that you do not understand and start relearning math from there.
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What kind of calculus? For business, science,...?
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Yeah, the Khan Academy founder addressed this issue in his Ted Talk. He focuses on mastery, as in getting so good at a subject until you can't do it wrong and then moving on to the next level. Meanwhile schools pass students with a D or C onto a next level, but it only gets harder from there. His philosophy is, "Great, you got a 95% on your last test, but what about the 5%?"
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Better go back to khan academy and master algebra 1-3 + precalc gl
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Precalc probably shouldn't be a topic, your grade is more or less irrelevant. Have you done well enough in other courses, such as Algebra 2?
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I got a B in precalc, failed calc 1, retook it and got a C+, realized there was no way I’d be able to pass calc 2, went back and redid precalc (A+) then redid calc 1 with a B+. I haven’t gotten around to completing calc 2 yet, which is frustrating because now I’ve forgotten everything - goddamn pandemic.

I’d suggest dropping it and redoing precalc, focusing super heavy on getting comfortable with trig identities and proofs.

I also ended up paying for a Thattutorguy subscription because I found it way more helpful and thorough than khan academy or any other free sources (I get no benefits from promoting this).
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Here's a plan that might help, although with a fair bit of work - tell your prof or TA what your situation is. Get a pre-calc book from the library (or off the shelf in the math department where people throw their old books, which very likely exists.) Every week ask them what are the main algebra skills being used that week - is it function stuff (probably), is it trig(once in awhile), is it factoring (it is when you get to the graphing section). There will almost certainly be a lot of problems that focus on that skill in your pre-calc book. Get your prof, your TA, the tutor center, whoever you can to help you practice those. It's better to get the practice as you need it rather than cramming in review right now. Then the calc class where you use the skills can help reinforce them.
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I also struggled with algebra going back to school but Black Pen Red Pen on youtube helped out alot with (100 algebra problems for Calclus). I would run through about 5 problems at the beginning of the day ~ 15 minutes following along with the solution. Also, realizing there is a problem is already a huge step towards overcoming it. I had to drop from Calc 3 back to Calc 1 becuase my math was so rusty and my math credit was from a community college not a top university. Better to build a good foundation now for more advanced courses.
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