0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
What is the most poetic math book you've read ?

20 Answers

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
*Calculus* by Spivak.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Arguably not poetic but certainly more expressive than most math (be it popular or technical) books: (1) The character of physical law, Feynman; (2) what is the name of this book?, Smullyan.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Maybe not what you were looking for but please do take a look at _Gödel Escher Bach_ if you don't know about it.

If you are just starting with undergrad or are still in highschool you may also like _Burn Math Class and Reinvent Mathematics for Yourself_.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
These aren’t textbooks, but Paul Lockhart writes beautifully about mathematics in *Measurement* and *Arithmetic*, both relatively short books about elementary topics.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Winning Ways for Your Mathematical Plays is so so beautifully written. Lots of whimsy, and it uses a lot of examples to explain the concepts (there are kind of like metaphors for the operations the authors introduce)
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
By far the most poetic math book I've read is Kato/Kurokawa/Saito *Number Theory 1: Fermat's Dream.*

Here's a quote:

"In the long history of mathematics, a number meant a real number, and it is only relatively recently that we realized that there is a world of p-adic numbers. It is as if those who had seen the sky only during the day are marvelling at the night sky. The mathematical scenery is competely different. Q_p emits „the light of prime number p“ in the night sky as if it were a star that we could not see because of the sun, or the real number field R, which emits „the light of real numbers“ during the day. Just as there are countless stars in the night sky, there is one  Q_p  for each p. What each star is to the sun is what each Q_p is to R. Just as we can see space objects better at night, we began to see the profound mathematical universe through the p-adic numbers."
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Not sure if it's what you're looking for, but "Apology of a Matematician" sure gives some emotions
by
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
I can honestly say that I've never seen, nor do I expect to ever see, a book more uniquely written than Knuth's Surreal Numbers: How Two Ex-Students Turned On to Pure Mathematics and Found Total Happiness
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Analysis 1 by Terrence Tao!

Related questions

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
2 answers
a_dalgleish asked Jun 21
Contributing to the right math area, If all areas are equally curious
a_dalgleish asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
3 answers
Saerkijaervi asked Jun 21
Is it wise to pursue math not endorsed by the community? Reflections on Leslie Lamport's Program Model Checking
Saerkijaervi asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
3 answers
bendiek asked Jun 21
Math on GitHub: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
bendiek asked Jun 21
by bendiek
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
16 answers
AdamGreen asked Jun 21
Books used in undergrad math at colleges outside the United States.
AdamGreen asked Jun 21
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
7 answers
DisruptorMgmt asked Jun 21
Oeisle , guess the math sequence from OEIS.
DisruptorMgmt asked Jun 21

29.6k questions

121k answers

0 comments

33.7k users

OhhAskMe is a math solving hub where high school and university students ask and answer loads of math questions, discuss the latest in math, and share their knowledge. It’s 100% free!