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The Langlands Program, Explained (Quanta Magazine)

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I think they should talk more. This is more of a video about Fermat's Last Theorem and automorphic form rather than Langlands program. They should at least mention quadratic reciprocity and upgrade to class field theory.
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This was an amazing video. Quanta has been killing it with the production quality lately
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If you were a later-stage math grad student from a different field who found this article interesting, what's the next thing you'd read?
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Can someone give a deeper ELIU for someone who has done Linear, Abstract and Real Analysis ?
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This was such a well produced video ! The production quality was phenomenal !
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i'd be interested to know how much more data had to be transferred for all views due to the grainy filter they applied.
by

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