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During high school, I used to keep a google docs or an entire physical notebook filled with neatly typed or written out questions that I've completed, my thought processes, and the explanations for review. Then, every evening or the morning thereafter, I would methodically review all of my mistakes and try to resolve the practice questions that I've completed just to make sure that I still remember how to do them. Oftentimes, I also found that reviewing old questions several months later into the school year would help me solidify my then understanding of the topic allow allow me to form new insights. Furthermore, I often found that simply sitting down and thinking for a long time how best to write out the answer explanations to certain practice questions in a way that I understood it also really helped to clarify my own understanding, and allowed me to see how my understanding evolved over time.

This method ended up working quite well for me personally, and I ended utilising a similar method when studying for similar STEM exams, the SAT, and math competitions.

However, now that I'm taking math classes in College, I've been struggling to keep up with both the reviews, and the compiling of the past questions that I've completed due to the sheer pace and amount of content that's covered. The problem now with this is that I would end up completing a practice set of questions... only to forget how to do them again a few weeks later, meaning that by the time exam rolls around at the end of the semester, I would often completely forget how to complete questions based on content from the first few weeks of the semester. As such, even though I would completed several practice exam questions, I would find myself still struggling with questions in the final exams similar to past questions that I vaguely remember completing, yet am unable to complete in time under time pressure.

How do you keep track of, or review the past practice questions that you've completed? - if at all? Furthermore, how do you study for 2-3 maths exams within a single week?!?
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You have to review and integrate new material with old material continuously, rather than as a batch process.

Relying on handwritten notes too heavily leads to rote memorization of problem solving strategies, rather than a true understanding.
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I never did anything like that. I reviewed some homework questions before the exam and that’s basically all I did in terms of reviewing homework
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I try to just hold a conversation with another person about the concepts. The definitions and theorems and some of the interesting ways you remember applying them in one problem or another. They'll have latched onto some pieces better than you did and vice versa. Found that incredibly productive. Never took any notes on lectures or problems, began keeping LaTeX files of all my homework writeups once I was at a point taking a second course in analysis on undergrad, and TeXed everything from there forward. But never really looked back on them, didn't feel the need. The time I spent on a problem writing sketches of the proof by hand , talking with peers, and finalizing the arguments structure with TeX, was more than enough to internalize. For exams, again deliberate additional time spent conversing with peers. Doesn't have to take that long.
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