0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
What colleges have the best actuarial science degrees?

43 Answers

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Wherever you end up, don’t take on 100k in debt just for a slightly better program. Not worth the extra 50-75k.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Study computer science with a minor in act sci.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
If you’re set on becoming an actuary, go to one of the schools that lets you skip exams. You’ll apparently know as much as someone who passed the exam but you don’t have to go through the bother of actually proving it. Highly recommend it
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
As an NJ Actuary, I went to Temple's masters program and they have a wonderful actuarial science program.  It's a CAE and in Philly.  Can't speak to the quality of the other schools, but look into Temple if you can.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
This might be a hot take for this sub but don’t waste the money and your college experience on an actuarial degree. It’s literally 10 exams that future jobs will pay for you to study and pass. No reason to spend a quarter of a million on something everyone else is getting with “a dollar fifty in late charges at the local public library”

Furthermore, you’re making an extreme commitment to being an actuary by getting an actuarial degree. You’re paying for a college education that teaches you to pass 7 exams… (or tests you out of these exams). College is supposed to be a time when you’re broadening your perspective and learning new things.

If you want to be an actuary get a degree in finance or math and in your spare time take and pass the exams. Also take random classes on subjects that you have a passing interest in: the classes I learned the most from in college.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Rutgers is not a CAE, but I’m not sure if I would go to Penn State with out of state tuition. I know a decent amount of actuaries who went to Rutgers. I’m at Penn State now.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Go to one that’s a CAE and is close to a lot of actuarial employers so they’ll have relationships with alumni that work at those companies. The two reasons to major in actuarial science are the classes that teach you the exam content for the first few exams and the job fairs.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Not many people are answering the question.

Penn State, UConn, and Purdue have always had major recruiting classes every year with us for interns and entry level candidates.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
I graduate from FSU this fall and we have a great and active actuarial science program and I also have a second major in Risk management/insurance that is through the college of business and it overlapped so many classes that it only took about an extra semester to get
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Sort of a general comment about university shopping: I believe the value of getting your education affordably cannot be understated. I went to a public university where the academic scholarships offered were high in comparison to the tuition rates, and I maintained my scholarship and left without any student loan debt. I ended up with a great job and I don’t have to make loan payments every month, and I’m very thankful for that.

That being said, ask directly how many students complete actuarial internships in the respective programs you’re considering, and compare it to how many actuarial science majors are in the programs. Connected-ness is also very important, so I’d recommend that you attempt to strike a balance between affordability and connectivity. Best of luck!

No related questions found

33.4k questions

135k answers

0 comments

33.7k users

OhhAskMe is a math solving hub where high school and university students ask and answer loads of math questions, discuss the latest in math, and share their knowledge. It’s 100% free!