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Is there a point in going to lectures anymore?

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Your own learning style is definitely important to consider and I have had some epicly bad Calc professors, but I do think their is value in learning somewhere where you can ask questions or at least hear other questions being asked
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> I taught myself how to code via YouTube

Did you? How do you evaluate the quality of your code? How do you know if there isn't a simpler, more efficient alternative to something you've coded? How do you know if your code is difficult for a collaborator to parse and understand?

In general, it's easy to start "doing stuff" using online materials, but it's very difficult to evaluate the quality of your own work, especially when you're just starting out. This is doubly true in math, where you might be able to develop a half-right intuition that works just well enough to solve a few simple problems, but you have no way of *knowing* whether you actually understand a concept properly without guidance from someone who knows more than you do.
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Whatever works for you, really. I personally self-teach better generally as well, but the danger in ditching lectures altogether is losing track of the pacing and missing out on class announcements.

Learn from my mistakes and at least get contact info for some people in your class and go to lectures occasionally to make sure you keep pace and dont miss any important announcements. I got a B- in one of my classes this last semester because I lost 20% credit outright on a midterm from having to make it up since I missed it initially. (There were no announcements or posted class schedules, so I think the prof shares a good bit of blame but oh well)
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I would check which professor you’re taking on RateMyProfessor. Most CC professor’s are actually decent but if you end up with a bad one I would recommend skipping lectures and teaching yourself. The lectures I used for Calc 1-3 are from Professor Leonard on YouTube. I would recommend reading the textbook chapter you’re on in class, watching a lecture, and then doing the required exercises. Good luck!
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It’s advisable to go to lectures, even if they’re not very good, because the content will never be exactly the same as the YouTube. Ideas. The professor might expect you to know stuff that’s not covered in the videos.
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Depends on the quality of lecture in person. I would suggest going in person and watching the lectures online to compare how well you understand the material from each one and if anything was missed during the online lecture.

I’ve often found in person lectures to be much more thorough and insightful, and become absolutely wonderful if the professor is a good teacher. I’ve even gained new insights around other areas in math, not just the subject one, if the lecturer is experienced.

Occasionally in-person lectures are absolute wastes of time, especially when factoring in transport. Some professors are terrible teachers and I’ve had to teach myself the course through online material anyway.
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yes, for discipline and to maintain sanity.
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A lot of students try skipping lectures and don't succeed. If you aren't going to class, by the time you realize you aren't getting the material, it will often be too late.

If you don't learn well from lectures, consider reviewing from lectures instead. Learn the material yourself first, then go to class expecting to understand everything. If there is anything new or that you don't understand, you will be in a good place to ask a question. If you understand the material completely, then do other work in class.
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I assume you taught yourself to code because you actually find it interesting. It seems the issue here is that the material hasn't been presented to you in an engaging way, otherwise, how could you not find Calculus interesting? I'm biased because I taught math for years at the university level lol. A professor's lecture should provide insight into the material that a textbook can't give you because it's limited. A professor should be able to go beyond the concepts by providing alternate approaches, showcasing applications, and asking thought-provoking questions. If your lectures don't include any of these, then maybe there's not much of a point attending. You could just learn the material on your own but don't be surprised if watching YT videos or reading materials on your work doesn't work as well for Calc :D
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I would go to lectures at least to see where the class is at, and then supplement that with YouTube stuff. I also have a hard time paying attention in lectures and sitting in the front row of the class helped me pay attention because I felt like I couldn’t let my mind wander, so that could potentially help too.

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