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Do you think exam/title raises will soon be adjusted for inflation?

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This sentiment is partially why I prefer our percentage based raises. When starting wages naturally receive market adjustments over time, it means that exam raises keep pace. However, percentage based exam raises do imply that you’ll receive a higher raise for completing an exam later in your career than you would get for the same exam earlier since you’ll have a higher base. It’s a bit of a trade off, but I don’t think I’ve seen someone delay an exam sitting because they want the next promotion first.
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Well, it feels like the SOA has added 19.4% more exam hours since 2013 so that should take care of it.
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This is going to depend on each company. My boss tried to update exam raises in the program every few years to keep up with inflation/market.

For title promotions specifically, any company worth its salt should be keeping data on market rates and hopefully keeping their staff updated accordingly if performance warrants it.
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I wouldn’t get too greedy- you might be able to get a $96,000 raise from the new ATPA exam.
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My company has all but guaranteed that raises are actually going to decrease in accordance with HR's ruling that exam raises be based on hour of exam. That's right, PA has the same raise as the uppers.

Guess I need to hit the books to make sure I can pass a 5 hour exam in the fall.
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I'm worrying that we'll get the opposite - the decrease in exam hours for fsa will cut our raises.
by
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I got curious about this a few weeks ago and looked for my companies old exam policies. I found the policy from 2013 and when adjusted for inflation the exam raises are higher in 2022 than 2013.
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The only reason exam raises will go up is to attract talent that values it, because it’s a guarantee rather than telling someone they’ll make 150k at ASA if they perform well like most normal business professions.

I don’t think they need to go up otherwise though. Like many careers the actuarial profession has and can move to a system that rewards good work over just exam progression. Companies hire actuaries with zero exams today, if they come in and do better than someone with 4, they should be paid more. Those 4 exams mean nothing, you can’t sign anything with 4 exams, you didn’t learn anything that makes you better at your job, and the company actually paid you to study for them. I think some incentive is ok to help people progress but salaries should be mostly based on performance and value. Which means work product, title/credential need. You can negotiate a higher salary whenever you want if you think you’re worth more.
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We adjusted ours and will adjust every few years going forward.

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