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What is it like working in the department of insurance as an actuary?

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You can reject the rate filings of all the actuaries that rejected you when you tried to apply to the private sector.
by
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Great WLB, low pay, great retirement benefits.
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If you're not celebrating a birthday everyday, your doing it wrong... Lol. Okay, I'm joking. It's chill, but the pay and career progression leaves a bit more to be desired.
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Pretty awesome. Great pay. Great wlb. Very interesting projects, and I feel like I’ve accumulated a ton of technical and soft skills that are transferable to tons of other careers and jobs.

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